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Swedish MEP believes his country will one day also join eurozone

Swedish European Parliament Member (MEP) Gunnar Hokmark said that Sweden will eventually introduce the euro, but that there is no need for the country to rush into things at the moment.

Hokmark, who is a member of the European People's Party in the European Parliament, said that he highly values Latvia's ability to overcome the economic crisis and join the eurozone.

Asked about the negative attitude Swedes have towards the euro, Hokmark admitted that is true, but that the residents of his country do not have anything against a stable currency. "I believe Sweden will continue to hesitate in regard to Europe's economic development. Less due to the currency itself, but more due to different policies in other EU member states. Great Britain is having big problems at the moment, and they are not eurozone members. Meanwhile, Germany is doing very well, and they have the euro. This is not a currency matter. Sweden itself is doing relatively well at the moment, thus there are few calls for change. In reality, Sweden would benefit from eurozone membership, as this would mean that we would have a much more stable currency, which would in turn help stimulate exports."

Hokmark believes that Sweden will one day have the euro. Looking towards the future of the eurozone in the upcoming ten years, Hokmark says: "I believe we will see Poland and Lithuania join the euro. At the same time, we are seeing more active discussions on this matter in countries like Sweden and Denmark. When exactly, I do not know. We do not need to rush into things, as each country needs to figure this out on its own."

In 2003, a non-binding referendum was held in Sweden, where 56.1 percent of residents voted against joining the eurozone. In recent years, euro-skepticism has risen in the Scandinavian country, which in large part has been influenced by the eurozone debt crisis.

leta.lv

06-08-2013
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